Banned Books Week

Celebrating the Freedom to Read: Sept. 21-27, 2014

Audio PSAs

  • Dave Barry

    David "Dave" Barry is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American author and columnist, who wrote a nationally syndicated humor column for The Miami Herald from 1983 to 2005. For 25 years he was a syndicated columnist whose work appeared in more than 500 newspapers in the United States and abroad. In 1988 he won the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary. He has written over 30 books of humor and parody, as well as comedic novels. Dave lives in Miami, Florida, with his wife, Michelle, a sportswriter. He has a son, Rob, and a daughter, Sophie, neither of whom thinks he's funny.

  • Roy Blount, Jr.

    Roy Blount Jr. is the author of twenty-three books, about everything from the first woman president of the United States to what barnyard animals are thinking. Latest is Alphabetter Juice: The Joy of Text, now out in paperback from Farrar, Straus, and Giroux. He is a panelist on NPR's Wait, Wait...Don't Tell Me, ex-president of the Authors Guild, a member of PEN and the Fellowship of Southern Authors, a New York Public Library Literary Lion, a Boston Public Library Literary Light, a usage consultant to the American Heritage Dictionary, and an original member of the Rock Bottom Remainders. He comes from Decatur, Georgia and lives in western Massachusetts. In 2009 he received the Thomas Wolfe Award from the University of North Carolina

  • Matt Groening

    Matt Groening's television show, "The Simpsons," is now the longest-running comedy in history. Born in Portland, Oregon, Groening moved to Los Angeles in the early 80s and started his weekly comic strip, "Life in Hell," which continues to this day in syndication and book sales. He has won multiple Emmy® Awards, the prestigious Peabody® Award, Annie Awards and the Rueben Award for Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year, the highest honor presented by the National Cartoonist Society. He also received a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in February 2012.

  • Mary Karr

    Mary Karr is an award-winning poet and best-selling memoirist. She is the author of Lit, the long-awaited sequel to her critically acclaimed and New York Times bestselling memoirs The Liars' Club and Cherry.

  • James McBride

    James McBride is an author, musician and screenwriter. His landmark memoir, "The Color of Water," is considered an American classic and read in schools and universities across the United States. His debut novel, "Miracle at St. Anna" was translated into a major motion picture directed by American film icon Spike Lee. His newest novel, "Song Yet Sung," was released in paperback in January 2009. He is also a former staff writer for The Boston Globe, People Magazine and The Washington Post. His work has appeared in Essence, Rolling Stone, and The New York Times. His April, 2007 National Geographic story entitled “Hip Hop Planet” is considered a respected treatise on African American music and culture. James is a saxophonist who tours with his six piece jazz/r&b band. He served as a sideman with jazz legend Jimmy Scott among others. He has written songs (music and lyrics) for Anita Baker, Grover Washington Jr., Purafe, Gary Burton, and even for the PBS television character "Barney." James is a native New Yorker and is married with three children.

  • Amy Tan

    Amy Tan is the author of several bestselling novels, including The Joy Luck Club, The Kitchen God's Wife, The Hundred Secret Senses, The Bonesetter's Daughter and Saving Fish from Drowning. She is also the author of a collection of non-fiction essays entitled The Opposite of Fate: A Book of Musings and two children’s books, The Moon Lady and Sagwa, the Chinese Siamese Cat. She is at work on a new novel, The Valley of Amazement, to be published by HarperCollins

  • Scott Turow

    Scott Turow is a writer and attorney. He is the author of nine best-selling works of fiction, including his first novel Presumed Innocent (1987) and its sequel, Innocent (May 4, 2010). His works of non-fiction include One L (1977) about his experience as a law student, and Ultimate Punishment (2003), a reflection on the death penalty. He frequently contributes essays and op-ed pieces to publications such as The New York Times, Washington Post, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, Playboy and The Atlantic.